Contagious: Why Things Catch On Book Cover Contagious: Why Things Catch On
Jonah Berger
Non-Fiction
Simon & Schuster
Mar 5 2013
Hard Cover
256

From the Publisher:

"Contagious combines groundbreaking research with powerful stories. Learn how a luxury steakhouse found popularity through the lowly cheese-steak, why anti-drug commercials might have actually increased drug use, and why more than 200 million consumers shared a video about one of the seemingly most boring products there is: a blender. If you’ve wondered why certain stories get shared, e-mails get forwarded, or videos go viral, Contagious explains why, and shows how to leverage these concepts to craft contagious content. This book provides a set of specific, actionable techniques for helping information spread—for designing messages, advertisements, and information that people will share."


Contagious: Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger is an insightful study of what sort of information spreads. Conveyed with real-world examples, Contagious is at once analytical and practical. Berger explores the impact of social currency, triggers, emotions and more on the spreading and accepting of messages and information. This book is useful for marketers and propagandists alike.

For an added treat, try the audio book as read by Jonah Berger. This is one academic we’d love to hear present live.

Contagious: Why Things Catch On is available for purchase on Amazon.


About Author

Alicia Wanless

La Generalista is the online identity of Alicia Wanless – a researcher and practitioner of strategic communications for social change in a Digital Age. Alicia researches how we shape — and are shaped — by a changing information space. As the Director of Strategic Communications at The SecDev Foundation, Alicia develops campaigns and strategies for engaging beneficiaries in outreach and behavioural change. Her work includes developing a training program that deals with verifying information and the spread of content online, and has supported projects in the Middle East, Vietnam and the post-Soviet space.

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